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Lenovo’s next Windows laptop could double up as a standalone Android tablet

Lenovo’s next Windows laptop could double up as a standalone Android tablet

The quirky new device could be announced at CES 2024.

A 2-in-1 laptop, with the display detached from the keyboard

Image: Zhuanlan.Zhihu

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Key Takeaways

  • Lenovo’s ThinkBook line continues to push the boundaries of Windows laptops with unique designs, such as secondary displays.
  • The company is reportedly developing a new ThinkBook Plus that can function as both a Windows laptop and a detachable Android tablet.
  • In addition, Lenovo’s next-gen ThinkBook 14+ and ThinkBook Plus 16 may feature Oculink ports, offering faster transfer speeds compared to Thunderbolt 4.

Having launched in 2020, Lenovo’s ThinkBook line of laptops has gone from strength to strength, offering quirky and offbeat designs that showcase exactly how interesting Windows laptops can be. Some of the unusual ThinkBook devices we have seen over the years include laptops with secondary displays, like the ThinkBook Plus Gen 2 i, which comes with an additional E-Ink panel that allows users to close its lid and use it as an eReader. The company is now reportedly looking to add to that legacy by introducing yet another unusual 2-in-1 laptop.

According to images posted on Chinese social media (via Liliputing), Lenovo is working on several new ThinkBook models, including a new ThinkBook Plus device that will double up as a standalone Android tablet. As per the post, it could not only be used as a standard Windows laptop, but the display can also be detached from the keyboard to turn it into an Android tablet. There’s not a lot of information on the device for now, but we could get more details about it at CES 2024 next month.

Meanwhile, a separate post on Chinese social media (via Liliputing) claims that Lenovo‚Äôs next-gen ThinkBook 14+ laptop will ship with an Oculink port. Other leaks suggest that the ThinkBook Plus 16 could also have the same connectivity option. For those wondering, Oculink stands for ‘Optical Copper Link,’ and was designed to compete with Thunderbolt 3. The latest version, Oculink 2, supports up to 16 GB/s (PCIe 4.0 x8) transfer speeds, which is significantly more than the 5GB/s of Thunderbolt 4.

Oculink has long been used in servers, but has just started making its presence felt in consumer devices. Several Chinese companies, like GPD, One Netbook, and MINISFORUM have either already released or announced plans to launch devices with an Oculink port, but this is the first time a global PC OEM is prepping to use the feature in one of its global products. Either way, all these are social media rumors at the moment, so take them with a pinch of salt until officially confirmed by Lenovo.

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About The Author

Kishalaya has almost a decade’s worth of experience in tech journalism, having written thousands of news, guides, features, and reviews for multiple American, Canadian, and Indian blogs. As a tech buff, he loves to build his own PCs and flash custom ROMs on his Android devices. Apart from tech, his interests include automobiles and sports.

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